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0 votes
On the website Askyourcouncil.co.uk  it says:

‘There are rules about who is permitted to join a committee or sub-committee.

Sometimes non-councillors can be included (although with few exceptions, they cannot vote).

This is an excellent means of involving others, particularly young people, in council work.’

Unfortunately, it offers explanation of these 'rules' or where they might be found, not does it explain the process for inviting someone on to a committee.

As chair of a committee (eg Planning), that is not the Full Council meeting, can I invite someone to participate in the meeting (non-voting) and how does one achieve this?

Thank you!
by (140 points)

2 Answers

0 votes
Do you mean as a one off for a specific topic (such as the applicant in a planning application)  or as a regular contributor across a broad range of topics in a succession of committee meetings?
by (22.3k points)
Actually, it could be both. The key issue is: is it possible to invite someone who is not already on that committee, to attend and participate in a meeting (without voting rights), and if yes, what is the mechanism? e.g. notice period or other consideration
0 votes
There are a lot of variables here! Typically a committee is set up by the council, and the council appoints its members. It is possible for the council to delegate the power to appoint additional members to the committee, but not usually done. So formal additions to the committee usually involve a council decision, which should be a simple matter.

Committee meetings are open to the public, so anyone can attend. In small councils, committee meetings are often fairly informal. Although non-members do not have the right to participate, the chair of the committee may let them do so. This is not unlawful.

It is correct that committee members who are not councillors typically can engage in discussions but not vote. The main exception is a committee tasked with managing land, and in this case all committee members can vote.
by (33.5k points)
Thank you. What I am ideally looking for is information/definition regarding the 'rules' referred to on the askyourcouncil website, relating to: 'Sometimes non-councillors can be included (although with few exceptions, they cannot vote). This is an excellent means of involving others, particularly young people, in council work.' How does one achieve this?
There are no specific rules, other than the general provisions that councils may create committees and appoint members to them. The legislation states that a finance committee may not include non-councillors. Otherwise, a council is free to appoint who they like. As stated, appointments are made by the council, unless the council has delegated the power of appointment to the committee. In either case, appointment is by a resolution and vote. No individual can appoint members because of the general provision that an individual councillor cannot make decisions.

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